News tagged with gps

Related topics: satellite

Holding drivers' attention

Each day, an average of nine people are killed in the United States and more than 1,000 injured by drivers doing something other than driving.

May 21, 2013
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GPS-like technology helps diagnose prostate tumors

The lead investigator of a way to obtain images of prostate tumors and accurately diagnose them said Thursday that the new technology is the medical equivalent of a global positioning system for the prostate gland.

May 03, 2013
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Parents cautioned over 'common' brain injury

A newly developed paediatric concussion kit will help parents identify crucial signs of traumatic brain injury (TBI), one of the leading causes of acquired disability and death in children.

Apr 27, 2012
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Global Positioning System

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) developed by the United States Department of Defense and managed by the United States Air Force 50th Space Wing. It is the only fully functional GNSS in the world, can be used freely by anyone, anywhere, and is often used by civilians for navigation purposes. It uses a constellation of between 24 and 32 medium Earth orbit satellites that transmit precise radiowave signals, which allow GPS receivers to determine their current location, the time, and their velocity. Its official name is NAVSTAR GPS. Although NAVSTAR is not an acronym, a few backronyms have been created for it.

Since it became fully operational on April 27, 1995, GPS has become a widely used aid to navigation worldwide, and a useful tool for map-making, land surveying, commerce, scientific uses, tracking and surveillance, and hobbies such as geocaching. Also, the precise time reference is used in many applications including the scientific study of earthquakes and as a required time synchronization method for cellular network protocols such as the IS-95 standard for CDMA.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA