News tagged with gut

Related topics: bacteria , immune system

Do gut bacteria rule our minds?

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us—which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold—may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, ...

Aug 15, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (60) | comments 18

Research uncovers the "gut-brain axis"

Striking new evidence indicates that the gut microbiome, the ecological community of microorganisms that share our body, has a huge effect on brain function – much larger than we thought. ...

Nov 27, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (24) | comments 2

One in four has alarmingly few intestinal bacteria

All people have trillions of bacteria living in their intestines. If you place them on a scale, they weigh around 1.5 kg. Previously, a major part of these 'blind passengers' were unknown, as they are difficult or impossible ...

Aug 28, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (12) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

New study shows gut bacteria could cause type 2 diabetes

Studying gut bacteria can reveal a range of human illness. Now, new research shows that the composition of a person's intestinal bacteria could play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. These results, ...

Sep 26, 2012
popularity 5 / 5 (10) | comments 6 | with audio podcast

Gut microbes spur development of bowel cancer

It is not only genetics that predispose to bowel cancer; microbes living in the gut help drive the development of intestinal tumors, according to new research in mice published in the March issue of The Jo ...

Mar 03, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (10) | comments 0

Gastrointestinal tract

The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining matter. The major function of the gastrointestinal tract are ingestion, digestion, absorption, and defecation. The GI tract differs substantially from animal to animal. Some animals have multi-chambered stomachs, while some animals' stomachs contain a single box. In a human adult male, the GI tract is approximately 6.5 meters (20 feet) long and consists of the upper and lower GI tracts. The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment of the tract.

The remainder of this article focuses on human gastrointestinal anatomy; see digestion for the process in other organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA