News tagged with hypothalamus

Related topics: neurons , brain , obesity , food intake , nerve cells

Aging really is 'in your head'

Among scientists, the role of proteins called sirtuins in enhancing longevity has been hotly debated, driven by contradictory results from many different scientists. But new research at Washington University ...

Sep 03, 2013
popularity 4.6 / 5 (37) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Brain region may hold key to aging

While the search continues for the Fountain of Youth, researchers may have found the body's "fountain of aging": the brain region known as the hypothalamus. For the first time, scientists at Albert Einstein ...

May 01, 2013
popularity 4.8 / 5 (21) | comments 8 | with audio podcast

Eat too much? Maybe it's in the blood

Bone marrow cells that produce brain-derived eurotrophic factor (BDNF), known to affect regulation of food intake, travel to part of the hypothalamus in the brain where they "fine-tune" appetite, said researchers from Baylor ...

Feb 26, 2013
popularity 4.3 / 5 (6) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Estrogen: Not just produced by the ovaries

A University of Wisconsin-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen—a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout ...

Dec 04, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 2 | with audio podcast

Hypothalamus

The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain that contains a number of small nuclei with a variety of functions. One of the most important functions of the hypothalamus is to link the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland (hypophysis). The hypothalamus, (from Greek ὑποθαλαμος = under the thalamus) is located below the thalamus, just above the brain stem. In the terminology of neuroanatomy, it forms the ventral part of the diencephalon. All vertebrate brains contain a hypothalamus. In humans, it is roughly the size of an almond.

The hypothalamus is responsible for certain metabolic processes and other activities of the Autonomic Nervous System. It synthesizes and secretes neurohormones, often called hypothalamic-releasing hormones, and these in turn stimulate or inhibit the secretion of pituitary hormones. The hypothalamus controls body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and circadian cycles.

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