News tagged with immune

Related topics: immune system

Cardiac repair: Neutrophils to the rescue

Following an acute heart attack, immune cells called neutrophils coordinate an inflammatory response which can exacerbate the damage to the organ. Now researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have ...

Feb 10, 2016
popularity0 comments 0

Atherosclerosis—a short cut to inflammation

The enzyme Dicer processes RNA transcripts, cutting them into short segments that regulate the synthesis of specific proteins. An Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team has shown that Dicer promotes the development ...

Feb 10, 2016
popularity1 comments 0

You can train your body into thinking it's had medicine

Marette Flies was 11 when her immune system turned against her. A cheerful student from Minneapolis, Minnesota, she had curly brown hair and a pale, moon-shaped face, and she loved playing trumpet in her high-school band. ...

Feb 09, 2016
popularity15 comments 0

Wholesome wholegrain

When it is a matter of health, whole grain has the X factor—or rather the BX factor—in the form of a certain group of bioactive compounds called benzoxazinoids, or BX. Scientists from Aarhus University have documented ...

Feb 08, 2016
popularity5 comments 0

The future of cancer treatment

1 in 3 people born after 1960 in the UK will be diagnosed with some form of cancer in their lifetime, and each year, 4th February marks World Cancer Day, to raise awareness and encourage individuals and governments to fight ...

Feb 05, 2016
popularity7 comments 0

Immunity (medical)

Immunity is a biological term that describes a state of having sufficient biological defenses to avoid infection, disease, or other unwanted biological invasion. Immunity involves both specific and non-specific components. The non-specific components act either as barriers or as eliminators of wide range of pathogens irrespective of antigenic specificity. Other components of the immune system adapt themselves to each new disease encountered and are able to generate pathogen-specific immunity.

Adaptive immunity is often sub-divided into two major types depending on how the immunity was introduced. Naturally acquired immunity occurs through contact with a disease causing agent, when the contact was not deliberate, whereas artificially acquired immunity develops only through deliberate actions such as vaccination. Both naturally and artificially acquired immunity can be further subdivided depending on whether immunity is induced in the host or passively transferred from a immune host. Passive immunity is acquired through transfer of antibodies or activated T-cells from an immune host, and is short lived, usually lasts only a few months, whereas active immunity is induced in the host itself by antigen, and lasts much longer, sometimes life-long. The diagram below summarizes these divisions of immunity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed