News tagged with internal clock

Related topics: circadian rhythms

Sleep disrupted? maybe it's Daylight Saving Time

(HealthDay)—Sleep problems may surface for some after clocks were moved forward an hour Sunday morning for Daylight Saving Time because many people have difficulty changing their body clocks, a sleep expert ...

Mar 10, 2014
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Observing live gene expression in the body

Most of our physiological functions fluctuate throughout the day. They are coordinated by a central clock in the brain and by local oscillators, present in virtually every cell. Many molecular gearwheels of this internal ...

Jun 30, 2013
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Get a jump on daylight saving time

Many people will go to work on less sleep than normal Monday because they will have trouble adjusting to Daylight Saving Time.

Mar 08, 2013
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Cell death in retina helps tune our internal clocks

(Medical Xpress)—With every sunrise and sunset, our eyes make note of the light as it waxes and wanes, a process that is critical to aligning our circadian rhythms to match the solar day so we are alert during the day and ...

Mar 05, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Researchers discover how the flu virus tells time

Scientists have discovered that that the flu virus can essentially tell time, thereby giving scientists the ability to reset the virus' clock and combat it in more effective ways. According to researchers at the Icahn School ...

Jan 17, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Circadian rhythm

A circadian rhythm is a roughly-24-hour cycle in the biochemical, physiological or behavioral processes of living entities, including plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria (see bacterial circadian rhythms). The term "circadian", coined by Franz Halberg, comes from the Latin circa, "around," and diem or dies, "day", meaning literally "approximately one day." The formal study of biological temporal rhythms such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology.

Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated, and can be entrained by external cues, called Zeitgebers, the primary one of which is daylight. These rhythms allow organisms to anticipate and prepare for precise and regular environmental changes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA