News tagged with neuraminidase

What kind of research can we trust?

Research involving pharmaceutical company input is notoriously compromised. While not all industry ties lead to biased research, and not all biases are a consequence of industry ties, many studies show industry influence ...

Oct 08, 2014
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Tamiflu and Relenza: How effective are they?

Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. This is according ...

Apr 11, 2014
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Could turning on a gene prevent diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 % of cases of diabetes around the world, afflicting 2.5 million Canadians and costing over 15 billion dollars a year in Canada. It is a severe health condition which makes body cells incapable ...

Jul 22, 2013
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Neuraminidase enzymes are glycoside hydrolase enzymes (EC that cleave the glycosidic linkages of neuraminic acids. Neuraminidase enzymes are a large family, found in a range of organisms. The most commonly known neuraminidase is the viral neuraminidase, a drug target for the prevention of the spread of influenza infection. The viral neuraminidases are frequently used as an antigenic determinants found on the surface of the Influenza virus. Some variants of the influenza neuraminidase confer more virulence to the virus than others. Other homologs are found in mammalian cells, which have a range of functions. At least four mammalian sialidase homologs have been described in the human genome (see NEU1, NEU2, NEU3, NEU4).

Neuraminidases, also called sialidases, catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal sialic acid residues from the newly formed virions and from the host cell receptors. Sialidase activities include assistance in the mobility of virus particles through the respiratory tract mucus and in the elution of virion progeny from the infected cell.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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