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How can twins have different fathers?

The recent report from northern Hòa Bình province in Vietnam of twins born to two different fathers has been making headlines around the world. The father of the twins took the infants for DNA tests where it was revealed ...

Mar 14, 2016
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Mammalian fertilization, caught on tape

The development of every animal in the history of the world began with a simple step: the fusion of a spermatozoon (the male gamete) with an oocyte, or egg (the female gamete). Despite the ubiquity of this process, the actual ...

Feb 28, 2016
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Timebomb in the testicles investigated

Oxford scientists have for the first time been able to identify the origins of some severe disease-causing mutations within the testicles of healthy men. This discovery will help our understanding of how certain serious genetic ...

Feb 08, 2016
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Sperm carries information about dad's weight

Turns out dads are also eating for two. A study published December 3 in Cell Metabolism reveals that a man's weight affects the heritable information contained in sperm. The sperm cells of lean and obese men possess different ...

Dec 03, 2015
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A sperm, from the ancient Greek word σπέρμα (seed) and ζῷον (living being) and more commonly known as a sperm cell, is the haploid cell that is the male gamete. It joins an ovum to form a zygote. A zygote is a single cell, with a complete set of chromosomes, that normally develops into an embryo.

Sperm cells contribute half of the genetic information to the diploid offspring. In mammals, the sex of the offspring is determined by the sperm cell: a spermatozoon bearing a Y chromosome will lead to a male (XY) offspring, while one bearing an X chromosome will lead to a female (XX) offspring (the ovum always provides an X chromosome). Sperm cells were first observed by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1677.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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