News tagged with tamiflu

Related topics: influenza

Tamiflu doesn't offer relief promised, study finds

For the nearly 62 million Americans infected with influenza each year, oeseltamivir, commonly called Tamiflu, promises to offer relief. New research from the University of Georgia finds the medication may not have all of ...

Oct 26, 2012
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Liquid tamiflu for kids in short supply

(HealthDay)—Manufacturing problems have created a shortage of the liquid form of Tamiflu, which is designed for young children who can't swallow capsules, U.S. health officials announced Wednesday.

Jan 08, 2014
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Tamiflu and Relenza: How effective are they?

Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. This is according ...

Apr 11, 2014
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Oseltamivir

Oseltamivir (INN) (pronounced /ɒsəlˈtæmɨvɪr/) is a drug that blocks the influenza virus from spreading between cells in the body. Thus it is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of both Influenzavirus A and Influenzavirus B infection. Like zanamivir, oseltamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor. It acts as a transition-state analogue inhibitor of influenza neuraminidase, preventing progeny virions from detaching from infected cells.

Oseltamivir was the first orally active neuraminidase inhibitor commercially developed. It is a prodrug, which is hydrolysed hepatically to the active metabolite, the free carboxylate of oseltamivir (GS4071). It was developed by US-based Gilead Sciences and is currently marketed by Hoffmann–La Roche (Roche) under the trade name Tamiflu. In Japan, it is marketed by Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., which is more than 50% owned by Roche. Oseltamivir is generally available by prescription only.

Roche estimates that 50 million people have been treated with oseltamivir. The majority of these have been in Japan, where an estimated 35 million have been treated. Since June 2009, Roche has been forced to allow other companies to develop competing drugs to Tamiflu, after much speculation about Roche's so-called 'monopoly' of Tamiflu in the UK.[citation needed]

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