News tagged with tamoxifen

Related topics: women , breast cancer , cancer cells , breast cancer patients , estrogen

Small molecules can starve cancer cells

All cells in our body have a system that can handle cellular waste and release building blocks for recycling. The underlying mechanism is called autophagy and literally means "self-eating". Many cancer cells have increased ...

Oct 09, 2011
popularity 3.8 / 5 (4) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Proteomics can improve breast cancer treatment

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein that could help physicians decide what type of therapy patients with hormone driven breast cancer should go through. In a study, published in Nature Co ...

Jul 22, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Breast cancer drug fights fungal disease

Tamoxifen, a drug currently used to treat breast cancer, also kills a fungus that causes a deadly brain infection in immunocompromised patients. The findings, which could lead to new treatments for a disease that kills more ...

Feb 11, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Breast cancer recurrence defined by hormone receptor status

Human epidermal growth factor (HER2) positive breast cancers are often treated with the same therapy regardless of hormone receptor status. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Breast Cancer Research shows ...

Oct 01, 2012
popularity not rated yet | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Tamoxifen

Tamoxifen is an antagonist of the estrogen receptor in breast tissue and is therefore used in the treatment of breast cancer. As of 2004, it was the world's largest selling drug for that purpose.

Some breast cancer cells require estrogen to grow. Estrogen binds to and activates the estrogen receptor in these cells. Tamoxifen is metabolized into compounds that also bind to the estrogen receptor but do not activate it. Furthermore tamoxifen prevents estrogen from binding to its receptor. Hence breast cancer cell growth is blocked.

Tamoxifen was discovered by ICI Pharmaceuticals (now AstraZeneca) and is sold under the trade names Nolvadex, Istubal, and Valodex. However, the drug, even before its patent expiration, was and still is widely referred to by its generic name "tamoxifen."

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA