News tagged with tumor growth

Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. New research from The University ...

Oct 23, 2014
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Modeling tumor dormancy

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate. In pancreatic cancer, this stalemate—known as tumor dormancy—can last up to 25 years before becoming ...

Oct 16, 2014
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Weakness exposed in most common cancer gene

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers have found a biological weakness in the workings of the most commonly mutated gene involved in human cancers, known as mutant K-Ras, which they say can be exploited by drug chemotherapies ...

Feb 10, 2014
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Predicting cancer's next move

Research led by Broad senior associate member Levi Garraway and published this week in Nature offers a new approach to studying drug resistance in cancer. The approach helped them identify which biological pathwa ...

Nov 11, 2013
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New study links BPA and breast cancer tumor growth

UT Arlington biochemists say their newly published study brings researchers a step closer to understanding how the commonly used synthetic compound bisphenol-A, or BPA, may promote breast cancer growth.

Mar 06, 2014
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FAK helps tumor cells enter the bloodstream

Cancer cells have something that every prisoner longs for—a master key that allows them to escape. A study in The Journal of Cell Biology describes how a protein that promotes tumor growth also enables cancer ...

Jan 20, 2014
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Surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated that cancer cells – and not normal cells – can be killed by eliminating either the FAS receptor, also known as CD95, or its binding component, CD95 ligand.

Mar 21, 2014
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