News tagged with wheat

The pros and cons of going gluten-free

The number of Americans adopting gluten-free diets has grown dramatically over the past several years. Some avoid eating wheat, barley, and rye because they have an autoimmune disorder called celiac disease, ...

Jul 16, 2014
popularity 3.3 / 5 (4) | comments 0

Top 5 myths about gluten

In the past few years there has been a surge in gluten-free diets and products that claim giving up the protein can lead to healthier lifestyles. A New York Times article recently cited Mintel, a market research ...

Jun 06, 2014
popularity 3.6 / 5 (20) | comments 2

Non-celiac wheat sensitivity may be an allergy

(HealthDay)—Non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) may be a non-immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy, according to a review published online Nov. 5 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Nov 08, 2013
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Could dietary tweaks ease type 1 diabetes?

(HealthDay)—Eating foods that contain certain nutrients may help people with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes continue producing some insulin for as long as two years, a new study finds.

Aug 02, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

The anti-obesity effect of wheat polyphenols

Researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), have discovered that wheat polyphenols have effects that improve the rhythm of activity and suppress obesity and ...

Jul 01, 2013
popularity 1 / 5 (1) | comments 0

How beneficial polyphenols truly are?

Scientifically proving the health benefits of polyphenols, particularly in reducing cardiovascular disease risks, can only be useful when taking into account how they fit in the body's complexity.

Jun 25, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 0

What stands out on a label?

With nearly 400,000 items in every grocery store (Food Marketing Institute), there are hundreds of different ways a packaged food can be labeled. Editor A. Elizabeth Sloan gathers statistics about what language on food labels ...

May 14, 2013
popularity 4 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Immune-boosting foods may add to flu defense

(HealthDay)—As U.S. health officials recommend flu shots and frequent hand washing for protection during this season's influenza outbreak, dietitians point to another significant defense weapon: healthy ...

Jan 18, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (4) | comments 0

Wheat

T. aestivum T. aethiopicum T. araraticum T. boeoticum T. carthlicum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. ispahanicum T. karamyschevii T. macha T. militinae T. monococcum T. polonicum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii T. turanicum T. turgidum T. urartu T. vavilovii T. zhukovskyi References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22

Wheat (Triticum spp.) is a worldwide cultivated grass from the Fertile Crescent region of the Near East. In 2007 world production of wheat was 607 million tons, making it the third most-produced cereal after maize (784 million tons) and rice (651 million tons). Wheat grain is a staple food used to make flour for leavened, flat and steamed breads; biscuits, cookies, cakes, breakfast cereal, pasta, juice, noodles, and couscous; and for fermentation to make beer, alcohol, vodka, or biofuel. Wheat is planted to a limited extent as a forage crop for livestock, and the straw can be used as fodder for livestock or as a construction material for roofing thatch.

Although wheat supplies much of the world's dietary protein and food supply, as many as one in every 100 to 200 people has Celiac disease, a condition which results from an immune system response to a protein found in wheat: gluten (based on figures for the United States).

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA