Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

New immune Tx achieves remission in B-cell malignancies

(HealthDay)—A new T-cell immunotherapy has led to sustained regression in many previously relapsing and treatment-resistant cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, ...

Feb 17, 2016
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Modified killer T-cells wipe out leukemia: study

Three US cancer patients were brought back from the brink by a new therapy that turned their own immune cells into tumor killers, wiping out an advanced form of leukemia, researchers said Wednesday.

Aug 10, 2011
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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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