Psychology & Psychiatry

How to train your brain to lucid dream

Dreams can often be confusing and blurry experiences. Reduced critical thinking, little to no access to our true memories and heightened impulsivity and emotions during normal dream states often make for head-scratching moments ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Overcoming PTSD: Study reveals memory disruption drug target

Fight or flight, panic, trembling: Our brains are wired to ensure we respond instantly to fear. While that fear response may save our lives in the dangerous moment, at times people stay on high alert long after the threat ...

Medical research

Molecular switch for 'exhaustion mode' of immune cells discovered

Tumors and certain viral infections pose a challenge to the human body which the immune system typically fails to handle. In these diseases it switches to a hypofunctional state that prevents adequate protection. However, ...

Cardiology

Study urges doctors to be on alert for deep vein thrombosis

General practitioners and physicians are being urged to keep a careful eye on the potentially deadly condition of deep vein thrombosis because the signs and symptoms of DVT are non-specific and often difficult to diagnose, ...

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Alertness is the state of paying close and continuous attention, being watchful and prompt to meet danger or emergency, or being quick to perceive and act. It is related to psychology as well as to physiology. A lack of alertness is a symptom of a number of conditions, including narcolepsy, attention deficit disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, Addison's disease, or sleep deprivation. The word is formed from "alert", which comes from the Italian "all'erta" (on the watch, literally, on the height; 1618)

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