Alertness

Long layover? How about a workout at an airport gym?

Work out while waiting for your flight? That's an option now at Baltimore Washington International Airport, where the only gym at a U.S. airport past security opened this week with plans to open 20 more at airports by 2020.

Feb 01, 2017
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Stress-busting tips

(HealthDay)—Lying around your home watching TV isn't always the best way to unwind. Police dramas, the news—even sports programming—can be stress-inducing. Plus, it's a passive activity, and mildly addictive, and nowhere ...

Jan 30, 2017
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Like coffee, blue light keeps night drivers alert

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers from the Université Bordeaux Segalen, France, and their Swedish colleagues have recently demonstrated that constant exposure to blue light is as effective as coffee at improving night drivers' ...

Nov 23, 2012
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Alertness is the state of paying close and continuous attention, being watchful and prompt to meet danger or emergency, or being quick to perceive and act. It is related to psychology as well as to physiology. A lack of alertness is a symptom of a number of conditions, including narcolepsy, attention deficit disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, Addison's disease, or sleep deprivation. The word is formed from "alert", which comes from the Italian "all'erta" (on the watch, literally, on the height; 1618)

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