Autism Spectrum Disorder

Study links autism to changes in micro-RNAs

In an important new study, scientists at UCLA have found that the brains of people with autism spectrum disorders show distinctive changes in the levels of tiny regulator molecules known as microRNAs, which control the activities ...

Sep 01, 2016
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When children with autism grow old

In the public consciousness, autism spectrum disorder only affects children. In truth, ASD is a lifelong condition. But how it affects older adults is a gaping unknown in autism research. Now, a new and significant grant ...

May 27, 2015
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The term "autism spectrum" is often used to describe disorders that are currently classified as pervasive developmental disorders. Pervasive developmental disorders include autism, Asperger syndrome, Childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. These disorders are typically characterized by social deficits, communication difficulties, stereotyped or repetitive behaviors and interests, and/or cognitive delays. Although these diagnoses share some common features, individuals with these disorders are thought to be "on the spectrum" because of differences in severity across these domains.

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