Bladder Cancer

Telomere length predicts cancer risk

The length of the telomere "caps" of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) scientists will report ...

Apr 03, 2017
popularity407 comments 0

Mark of malignancy identified in prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second deadliest cancer in men in the U.S. It kills more than 26,000 men in the country every year. But, as in the case of breast cancer, one prostate cancer will progress rapidly while another tumor ...

Mar 31, 2017
popularity0 comments 0

Male cancer awareness

Cancer of the prostate is the most common cancer in men. The risk of prostate cancer increases with age and is quite rare in men under 50. One in eight men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Prostate cancer ...

Apr 06, 2017
popularity0 comments 0

Bladder cancer is any of several types of malignancy arising from the epithelial lining (i.e. "the urothelium") of the urinary bladder. The bladder is rarely involved by non-epithelial cancers (such as lymphoma or sarcoma) but these are not properly included in the colloquial term "bladder cancer." It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder. The bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine; it is located in the pelvis. The most common type of bladder cancer recapitulates the normal histology of the urothelium and is known as transitional cell carcinoma.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Exercise good for the spine

A world-first study has shown that specific physical activity benefits the discs in our spines and may help to prevent and manage spinal pain.

Could genetics influence what we like to eat?

Have you ever wondered why you keep eating certain foods, even if you know they are not good for you? Gene variants that affect the way our brain works may be the reason, according to a new study. The new research could lead ...

When liver immune cells turn bad

A high-fat diet and obesity turn "hero" virus-fighting liver immune cells "rogue", leading to insulin resistance, a condition that often results in type 2 diabetes, according to research published today in Science Immunology.