Brain Aneurysm

Understanding cerebral vasospasm brain injuries

Dr. Javier Provencio is on the trail of a 70-year-old medical mystery. He and colleagues at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made strides in finding the culprit behind a type of delayed cognitive deterioration ...

Mar 28, 2017
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Is there a link between telomere length and cancer?

Telomeres are regions of repetitive DNA at the end of human chromosomes, which protect the end of the chromosome from damage. Whilst shorter telomeres are hypothesized biological markers of older age and have been linked ...

Mar 23, 2017
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The Medical Minute: New treatment of brain aneurysms

(PhysOrg.com) -- Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center recently became only the third hospital in Pennsylvania and one of only about 30 institutions in the country to offer a new minimally invasive treatment for brain ...

Oct 07, 2009
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New treatment option for ruptured brain aneurysms

Researchers in Finland have identified an effective new treatment option for patients who have suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm, a potentially life-threatening event. Results of the new study on stent-assisted coil embolization ...

Aug 25, 2009
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A cerebral or brain aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery or vein causes a localized dilation or ballooning of the blood vessel.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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