Broken Heart Syndrome

'Broken heart syndrome' is real medical diagnosis

The sudden loss of a job, divorce, or the death of a loved one or even a family pet are things that cause us to experience overwhelming emotions. The term "broken-hearted" is often used to describe these reactions, but it's ...

Feb 23, 2017
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Emotional stress may trigger heart attack

(Medical Xpress)—Heart attack survivors who live alone and people exposed to extreme stress from events such as natural disasters or sporting events are at greater risk of heart attack, according to a Heart Foundation study ...

Aug 07, 2013
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Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as transient apical ballooning syndrome, apical ballooning cardiomyopathy, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, Gebrochenes-Herz-Syndrom, and simply stress cardiomyopathy, is a type of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy in which there is a sudden temporary weakening of the myocardium (the muscle of the heart). Because this weakening can be triggered by emotional stress, such as the death of a loved one, a break-up, or constant anxiety, the condition is also known as broken heart syndrome. Stress cardiomyopathy is a well-recognized cause of acute heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmias, and ventricular rupture.

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