Carcinoma

Successful phase 3 trial of drug for liver cancer

An international phase 3 trial has found that the drug regorafenib improved survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a form of liver cancer, giving people who previously had no other options a better ...

Jan 18, 2017
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Reducing the radioresistance of cancer

Most people recognize that many forms of cancer are treated with radiation therapy. However, some may not realize that there are cancer cells with the ability to survive this type of treatment. Oral squamous cell carcinoma ...

Jan 13, 2017
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One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified

Manuela Baccarini and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna are one step closer to unraveling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. The researchers discovered ...

Dec 21, 2016
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MicroRNAs 203 and 205 are prognostic in cutaneous SCC

(HealthDay)—MicroRNAs (miR-203 and miR-205) could be useful prognostic markers in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, with distinct expression and associations, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in the British ...

Dec 20, 2016
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Carcinoma (Gk. karkinos, or "crab", and -oma, "growth") is the medical term for the most common type of cancer occurring in humans. Put simply, a carcinoma is a cancer that begins in a tissue that lines the inner or outer surfaces of the body, and that generally arises from cells originating in the endodermal or ectodermal germ layer during embryogenesis. More specifically, a carcinoma is tumor tissue derived from putative epithelial cells whose genome has become altered or damaged to such an extent that the cells become transformed, and begin to exhibit abnormal malignant properties.

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