Psychology & Psychiatry

Rates of depression up in U.S. women at hospital to give birth

(HealthDay)—From 2000 to 2015, the rates of depressive disorders recorded for women during delivery hospitalization increased nationally, according to a study published online May 9 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Neuroscience

Multiple brain regions moderate and link depressive mood and pain

Depression is linked to diminished activity in parts of the brain believed to regulate mood, which previous research suggests may explain why depressed persons display an lessened ability to govern their ruminative thought ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Social networks and suicide prevention

Depression and mental health problems are increasing—and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Exercise: Psych patients' new primary prescription

When it comes to inpatient treatment of a range of mental health and mood disorders—from anxiety and depression to schizophrenia, suicidality and acute psychotic episodes—a new study advocates for exercise, rather than ...

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Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behaviour, feelings and physical well-being. Depressed people may feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, or restless. They may lose interest in activities that once were pleasurable, experience loss of appetite or overeating, or problems concentrating, remembering details or making decisions; and may contemplate or attempt suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, loss of energy, or aches, pains or digestive problems that are resistant to treatment may be present.

Depressed mood is a normal reaction to certain life events, a symptom of some medical conditions (e.g., Addison's disease, hypothyroidism), various medical treatments (e.g., hepatitis C drug therapy), and a feature of certain psychiatric syndromes.

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