Neuroscience

Finding the elusive drinking 'brake'

It's a common scene in bars and clubs: messy, falling-down drunk, slurring and incoherent, precariously close to catastrophe … and asking the bartender for another shot.

HIV & AIDS

Finding the right exercise, diet aids for HIV patients

Although generally true, it's not enough for health-care professionals to simply advise patients to "exercise more and eat better," especially for people dealing with the physical, mental and emotional challenges of a chronic ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Head off the blues when your teen heads to college

(HealthDay)—As excited as you are that your teen's going to college, it's normal to have mixed emotions, such as anxiety, sadness and possibly depression. It's even normal to feel envious that his or her life is just beginning ...

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Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behaviour, feelings and physical well-being. Depressed people may feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, or restless. They may lose interest in activities that once were pleasurable, experience loss of appetite or overeating, or problems concentrating, remembering details or making decisions; and may contemplate or attempt suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, loss of energy, or aches, pains or digestive problems that are resistant to treatment may be present.

Depressed mood is a normal reaction to certain life events, a symptom of some medical conditions (e.g., Addison's disease, hypothyroidism), various medical treatments (e.g., hepatitis C drug therapy), and a feature of certain psychiatric syndromes.

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