Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Researchers solve the mystery of the acid pump

Researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, have succeeded in identifying the mechanisms involved in what is known as the acid pump, which at the cellular level pumps acid into the stomach - in some cases leading to gastric ...

Mar 07, 2017
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Is it heartburn or a heart attack?

Dear Mayo Clinic: My dad recently went to the emergency room with terrible chest pain and sweating, and was concerned he was having a heart attack. He was kept overnight for monitoring, but doctors said his heart was fine ...

Mar 03, 2017
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Gastroesophageal reflux linked to tooth surface loss

(HealthDay) -- Tooth surface loss is significantly greater in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) than in controls, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Dental ...

Mar 06, 2012
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Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), gastric reflux disease, or acid reflux disease is a chronic symptom of mucosal damage caused by stomach acid coming up from the stomach into the esophagus. A typical symptom is heartburn.

GERD is usually caused by changes in the barrier between the stomach and the esophagus, including abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, which normally holds the top of the stomach closed; impaired expulsion of gastric reflux from the esophagus, or a hiatal hernia. These changes may be permanent or temporary ("transient").

Another kind of acid reflux, which causes respiratory and laryngeal signs and symptoms, is called laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) or "extraesophageal reflux disease" (EERD). Unlike GERD, LPR is unlikely to produce heartburn, and is sometimes called silent reflux.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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