Oncology & Cancer

New methodology developed to monitor patients with glioblastoma

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. Currently, it can be treated with neurosurgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Still, the median life expectancy of patients affected with this pathology is ...

Medications

Exploring drug repurposing to treat glioblastoma

MALT1 blockers have long been in clinical use for the treatment of blood cancers. A study suggests that these drugs could potentially also be developed as a treatment option for glioblastoma, the most common and lethal type ...

Oncology & Cancer

New strategy for treating the most aggressive type of brain cancer

Researchers from the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil have developed a strategy for treating the most aggressive type of brain cancer in adults that combines a photoactive molecule and a chemotherapeutic agent—both ...

Medical research

Cell death or cancer growth: A question of cohesion

Activation of CD95, a receptor found on all cancer cells, triggers programmed cell death—or does the opposite, namely stimulates cancer cell growth. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now shown ...

Medical research

Potential drug targets for glioblastoma identified

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified 10 tumour-specific potential drug targets for the brain tumour glioblastoma. The results are presented in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

Oncology & Cancer

The 'Goldilocks' principle for curing brain cancer

In the story of Goldilocks, a little girl tastes three different bowls of porridge to find which is not too hot, not too cold, but just the right temperature. In a study published in Advanced Therapeutics, University of Minnesota ...

Oncology & Cancer

Existing drug could treat aggressive brain cancer

A research team from the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that a compound molecule used for drug delivery of insulin could be used to treat glioblastoma, an aggressive, usually fatal form of ...

Medical research

Blood test can predict prognosis in deadly brain cancer

A blood test that measures the amount of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the bloodstream—called a liquid biopsy—correlates with how patients will progress after they are diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the deadliest and most ...

Oncology & Cancer

Neurons promote growth of brain tumor cells

In a current paper published in the journal Nature, Heidelberg-based researchers and physicians describe how neurons in the brain establish contact with aggressive glioblastomas and thus promote tumor growth / New tumor activation ...

Oncology & Cancer

Research going keto to fight cancer

Investigators at the University of Cincinnati are studying whether or not a modified Atkins-type ketogenic diet could help make treatments for a common, but dangerous, type of brain cancer called glioblastoma more effective.

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Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, involving glial cells and accounting for 52% of all functional tissue brain tumor cases and 20% of all intracranial tumors. Despite being the most prevalent form of primary brain tumor, GBMs occur in only 2–3 cases per 100,000 people in Europe and North America. According to the WHO classification of the tumors of the central nervous system‎, the standard name for this brain tumor is "glioblastoma"; it presents two variants: giant cell glioblastoma and gliosarcoma. Glioblastomas are also an important brain tumor in canines, and research continues to use this as a model for developing treatments in humans.

Treatment can involve chemotherapy, radiation, radiosurgery, corticosteroids, antiangiogenic therapy, surgery and experimental approaches such as gene transfer.

With the exception of the brainstem gliomas, glioblastoma has the worst prognosis of any central nervous system (CNS) malignancy, despite multimodality treatment consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection of as much of the tumor as possible, followed by concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy, antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab, gamma knife radiosurgery, and symptomatic management with corticosteroids. Prognosis is poor, with a median survival time of approximately 14 months.

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