Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Cause of cancer form in the liver identified

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified the two genes whose mutation cause a serious cancer form found in the liver. The result sets concrete goals for future treatment of the otherwise ...

Oct 12, 2017
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Telomere length prognostic in hepatocellular carcinoma

(HealthDay)—Telomere attrition occurs in tumor cells from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and shortened telomeres are independent prognosticators for HCC patients, according to a study published online Aug. ...

Aug 24, 2017
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Identifying a new type of liver tumor

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have succeeded in better defining a rare pediatric malignant liver disease—a necessary step in achieving an optimum treatment.

Aug 09, 2017
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Chronic cell death promotes liver cancer

Liver cancer occurs predominantly in patients whose liver has been damaged as a result of chronic disease. Until now, it was not known how these events are linked at the molecular level. An international team of scientists ...

Sep 11, 2017
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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, also called malignant hepatoma) is the most common type of liver cancer. Most cases of HCC are secondary to either a viral hepatitide infection (hepatitis B or C) or cirrhosis (alcoholism being the most common cause of hepatic cirrhosis).

Compared to other cancers, HCC is quite a rare tumor in the United States. In countries where hepatitis is not endemic, most malignant cancers in the liver are not primary HCC but metastasis (spread) of cancer from elsewhere in the body, e.g., the colon. Treatment options of HCC and prognosis are dependent on many factors but especially on tumor size and staging. Tumor grade is also important. High-grade tumors will have a poor prognosis, while low-grade tumors may go unnoticed for many years, as is the case in many other organs, such as the breast, where a ductal carcinoma in situ (or a lobular carcinoma in situ) may be present without any clinical signs and without correlate on routine imaging tests, although in some occasions it may be detected on more specialized imaging studies like MR mammography.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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