Psychology & Psychiatry

PTSD linked to ischemic heart disease in female veterans

(HealthDay)—In female veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (IHD), especially for younger women and for racial/ethnic minorities, according to a study ...

Cardiology

COVID-19 pandemic indirectly disrupted heart disease care

Deaths from ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States increased during the COVID-19 pandemic over the prior year, while globally, COVID-19 was associated with significant disruptions in cardiovascular ...

Cardiology

Sex differences in death after stroke

Women were 39% more likely to die by 1 year after a first stroke. The sex difference was due to advanced age and more severe strokes in women, according to a new study in the Journal of Women's Health.

Cardiology

A bypass route for the coronary vessels in the heart?

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality, and ischemic heart disease is a major cause of death worldwide. Coronary vessels that nourish the heart develop from three main sources, with the endocardium on the ...

Cardiology

Black patients with lupus have three times higher risk of stroke

New research reveals that, in the U.S., Black patients with lupus have a threefold higher risk of stroke and a 24-fold higher risk of ischemic heart disease. The study also found several lupus-specific symptoms that predict ...

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Ischaemic or ischemic heart disease (IHD), or myocardial ischaemia, is a disease characterized by ischaemia (reduced blood supply) of the heart muscle, usually due to coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries). Its risk increases with age, smoking, hypercholesterolaemia (high cholesterol levels), diabetes, and hypertension (high blood pressure), and is more common in men and those who have close relatives with ischaemic heart disease.

Symptoms of stable ischaemic heart disease include angina (characteristic chest pain on exertion) and decreased exercise tolerance. Unstable IHD presents itself as chest pain or other symptoms at rest, or rapidly worsening angina. Diagnosis of IHD is with an electrocardiogram, blood tests (cardiac markers), cardiac stress testing or a coronary angiogram. Depending on the symptoms and risk, treatment may be with medication, percutaneous coronary intervention (angioplasty) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG).

It is the most common cause of death in most Western countries, and a major cause of hospital admissions. There is limited evidence for population screening, but prevention (with a healthy diet and sometimes medication for diabetes, cholesterol and high blood pressure) is used both to prevent IHD and to decrease the risk of complications.

The medical history distinguishes between various alternative causes for chest pain (such as dyspepsia, musculoskeletal pain, pulmonary embolism). As part of an assessment of the three main presentations of IHD, risk factors are addressed. These are the main causes of atherosclerosis (the disease process underlying IHD): age, male sex, hyperlipidaemia (high cholesterol and high fats in the blood), smoking, hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, and the family history.

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