Oncology & Cancer

Immune therapy targets cells that cause leukemia relapse

Genetically engineered immune cells successfully target the specific cancer cells that may be responsible for relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of blood cancer, and proved effective in animal models of the disease, ...

Oncology & Cancer

New computer simulation cracks mystery of cancer drug resistance

Imatinib, better known as Gleevec, was hailed as a "miracle" cancer drug when it entered the market in the early 2000s. Though it has been highly successful at treating early-stage chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)—a rare ...

Medications

Locking leukemia's cellular escape hatch

Leukemia starts in cells that would normally develop into different types of blood cells. About 61,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed each year, and depending on the type of leukemia and the age of the patient, five-year ...

Oncology & Cancer

New effective combination therapy for pediatric T-acute leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer affecting children. The T-ALL form of leukemia that emerges from early T lineage cells has a poorer prognosis than B-lineage ALL. The prognosis for relapsed T-ALL ...

Leukemia (American English) or leukaemia (British English) (from the Greek leukos λεύκος - white, and haima αίμα - blood) is a type of cancer of the blood or bone marrow characterized by an abnormal increase of immature white blood cells called "blasts". Leukemia is a broad term covering a spectrum of diseases. In turn, it is part of the even broader group of diseases affecting the blood, bone marrow, heart, and lymphoid system, which are all known as hematological neoplasms. Leukemia can also cause multiple organ failure.

In 2000, approximately 256,000 children and adults around the world developed some form of leukemia, and 209,000 died from it.[citation needed]

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