Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pfizer says tweaked COVID-19 shots boost omicron protection

Pfizer announced Saturday that tweaking its COVID-19 vaccine to better target the omicron variant is safe and works—just days before regulators debate whether to offer Americans updated booster shots this fall.

Oncology & Cancer

Porous cells lead to poorer livers

Need another reason to think twice before ordering that extra helping of fries? It could lead to a higher risk of developing liver cancer. Cases of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)—a type of fatty liver disease that ...

Health

Environmental factors predict risk of death: study

Along with high blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking, environmental factors such as air pollution are highly predictive of people's chances of dying, especially from heart attack and stroke, a new study shows.

Medical research

Researchers uncover brain waves related to social behavior

Researchers at Tohoku University and the University of Tokyo have discovered electrical wave patterns in the brain related to social behavior in mice. They also observed that mice showing signs of stress, depression, or autism ...

Oncology & Cancer

An app to help doctors help patients with leukemia

Within five years, 25% of patients suffering from chronic Lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) will develop a serious infection or need early treatment for CL: 10% of these risk dying within a month.

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Melanoma i/ˌmɛləˈnoʊmə/ (from Greek μέλας - melas, "dark") is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can occur in any part of the body that contains melanocytes.

Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers. However, it is much more dangerous and causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly. The diagnosis is more frequent in women than in men and is particularly common among Caucasians living in sunny climates, with high rates of incidence in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Latin America, and northern Europe. According to a WHO report, about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year.

The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. The chance of a cure is greatest when the tumor is discovered while it is still small and thin, and can be entirely removed surgically.

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