Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

NAFLD linked to unfavorable metabolic profile in T2DM

(HealthDay)—For obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with an unfavorable metabolic profile, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Diabetes ...

Feb 17, 2016
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Researchers discover new fat-fighting pathway

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered a process that controls the amount of fat that cells store for use as a back-up energy source. Disruption of this process allows cellular ...

Apr 01, 2009
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Hormone identified that limits liver fibrosis

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been emerging worldwide and effective treatment, especially for liver fibrosis, is essential for improving the prognosis. A Japanese research team has identified and clarified the mechanism ...

Oct 13, 2016
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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one cause of a fatty liver, occurring when fat is deposited (steatosis) in the liver not due to excessive alcohol use. It is related to insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome and may respond to treatments originally developed for other insulin-resistant states (e.g. diabetes mellitus type 2) such as weight loss, metformin and thiazolidinediones. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most extreme form of NAFLD this being regarded as a major cause of cirrhosis of the liver of unknown cause.

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