Psychology & Psychiatry

A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease

After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Dementia rates fall in Australia ahead of expected surge

Dementia rates among older Australians are falling, sparking suggestions that measures aimed at improving the physical health of older people may also be having positive cognitive effects.

Diabetes

Mentally tiring work may increase diabetes risk in women

Women who find their jobs mentally tiring are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The study findings suggest that mentally draining work, such as ...

Health

CDC: most Americans report excellent, good health

(HealthDay)—Most Americans report having excellent or good health and have a usual place to go for medical care, according to a report published March 13 for the National Health Interview Survey Early Release Program.

Cancer

Infertility is linked to small increased risk of cancer

A study of over 64,000 women of childbearing age in the USA has found that infertility is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer compared to a group of over three million women without fertility problems, although ...

Cardiology

Researchers explore stroke's effects on microbiome

Tumult in the bacterial community that occupies your gut—known as your microbiome—doesn't just cause indigestion. For people recovering from a stroke, it may influence how they get better.

Neuroscience

Exploring hypothalamic circuits, one neuron at a time

A collaborative team from UConn Storrs and The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine characterized neuron diversity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a critical coordinator of fundamental behaviors in the brain. Using ...

Autism spectrum disorders

Researchers identify role gender-biased protein may play in autism

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain ...

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