Oncology & Cancer

Daily coffee doesn't affect cancer risk

Drinking coffee does not change a person's risk of being diagnosed with or dying from cancer, a new QIMR Berghofer study has found.

Oncology & Cancer

Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast

Breast cancer patients and women undergoing cancer-preventive breast surgeries may consider combining these procedures with hysterectomy and/or ovarian removal. However, a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published ...

Medical research

Crunching the numbers of cancer metastasis

In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the original tumor and take root in another region of the body by entering the blood stream. In order to spread, metastatic cells cross over the endothelium—a barrier of endothelial ...

Oncology & Cancer

Addicted to ran, ovarian cancer cells stop moving when deprived

Did you know that 90% of cancer patients die from distant metastasis? The latter occurs when cancer cells have the ability to move within the patient's body and invade its healthy tissues. In a study published in Nature Communications, ...

Oncology & Cancer

New biomarker test improves diagnosis of ovarian cancer

The majority of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian cancer do not have cancer. A novel blood test developed by researchers at Uppsala University and the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, now offers ...

Oncology & Cancer

Potential probe for early ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women and one of the most difficult malignancies to detect at an early stage.

Oncology & Cancer

Focus on ovarian cancer surgical volume may not be best metric

Limiting ovarian cancer surgery to high-volume surgeons and hospitals to improve survival could restrict care at many low-volume centers with better-than-expected outcomes, according to a study published in the June issue ...

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Ovarian cancer is a cancerous growth arising from the ovary. Symptoms are frequently very subtle early on and may include: bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating and frequent urination, and are easily confused with other illnesses.

Most (more than 90%) ovarian cancers are classified as "epithelial" and are believed to arise from the surface (epithelium) of the ovary. However, some evidence suggests that the fallopian tube could also be the source of some ovarian cancers. Since the ovaries and tubes are closely related to each other, it is thought that these fallopian cancer cells can mimic ovarian cancer. Other types may arise from the egg cells (germ cell tumor) or supporting cells. These cancers are grouped into the category of gynecologic cancer.

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