Peripheral Arterial Disease

Assessing heart disease risk is within arm's reach

Atherosclerosis, commonly known as hardening of the arteries, has long been seen as a strong indicator of coronary artery disease, as compared to the traditional risk factors of race, age, gender and metabolic profile. Unlike ...

Apr 14, 2017
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Eyes hold clues to future narrowing of leg vessels

Changes in tiny blood vessels of the eye may predict a higher risk of later narrowing in the large blood vessels in the legs, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention ...

Mar 09, 2017
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PCSK9 inhibition with bococizumab yields mixed results

In a clinical program that was terminated early, the experimental PCSK9 inhibitor bococizumab, when given on top of effective statin therapy, had widely varying effects on LDL cholesterol levels and had no benefit on cardiovascular ...

Mar 17, 2017
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Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), commonly referred to as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD), refers to the obstruction of large arteries not within the coronary, aortic arch vasculature, or brain. PVD can result from atherosclerosis, inflammatory processes leading to stenosis, an embolism, or thrombus formation. It causes either acute or chronic ischemia (lack of blood supply). Often PAD is a term used to refer to atherosclerotic blockages found in the lower extremity.

PVD also includes a subset of diseases classified as microvascular diseases resulting from episodal narrowing of the arteries (Raynaud's phenomenon), or widening thereof (erythromelalgia), i.e. vascular spasms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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