Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Vaccines: not just for kids

(HealthDay)—If you have children, you know how important it is to keep up with their immunization schedule.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Whopping numbers on whooping cough

(HealthDay)—The return of measles made headlines in recent years, but it's not the only disease that poses a particular threat to kids that has experienced a resurgence.

Medical research

Producing vaccines without the use of chemicals

Producing vaccines is a tricky task – especially in the case of inactivated vaccines, in which pathogens must be killed without altering their structure. Until now, this task has generally involved the use of toxic chemicals. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why whooping cough is making a comeback

After a week with a dry cough, 16-year-old Ian McCracken started experiencing middle-of-the-night coughing fits so severe, he couldn't talk. He returned home from his first trip to the urgent care clinic in mid-July with ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Whooping cough more widespread than previously known

New research from Public Health Ontario (PHO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) suggests that whooping cough cases in Ontario are happening much more frequently than previously known, reinforcing the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Whooping cough returns as vaccine modified to reduce side-effects

Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. - mostly babies and toddlers - were coming down with whooping cough each year when vaccines against "this menace," as one newspaper called it, were introduced in the 1930s and 1940s.

Pediatrics

Whooping cough outbreaks tied to parents shunning vaccines

(HealthDay)—New research confirms what experts have suspected: The decision not to vaccinate children for nonmedical reasons can have far-reaching effects, including raising the risk of infections for other children and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

More evidence whooping cough protection wanes

(HealthDay)—Despite high levels of vaccination, the rate of whooping cough in the United States is at its highest level in decades, and one reason may be that immunity from the vaccine diminishes each year after the fifth ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New Zealand's whooping cough admission rates cut by a fifth

Research from The University of Auckland, published in this month’s issue of The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, shows a 20 percent reduction in the New Zealand hospital admission rates for whooping ...

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Pertussis, also known as whooping cough ( /ˈhuːpɪŋ kɒf/ or /ˈhwuːpɪŋ kɒf/), is a highly contagious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. In some countries, this disease is called the 100 days' cough or cough of 100 days.

Symptoms are initially mild, and then develop into severe coughing fits, which produce the namesake high-pitched "whoop" sound in infected babies and children when they inhale air after coughing. The coughing stage lasts for approximately six weeks before subsiding.

Prevention via vaccination is of primary importance as treatment is of little clinical benefit to the person infected. Antibiotics, however, do decrease the duration of infectiousness and are thus recommended. It is estimated that the disease currently affects 48.5 million people yearly, resulting in nearly 295,000 deaths.

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