Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research is a scientific journal covering research concerning alcohol abuse and its treatment. It is published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search, Current Awareness in Biological Sciences, Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS Previews, CAB Abstracts, CAB HEALTH, CABDirect, CSA Biological Sciences Database, Current Contents, EMBASE, EMBiology, Index Medicus/MEDLINE/PubMed, Neuroscience Citation Index, Psychological Abstracts/PsycINFO, Science Citation Index, and Scopus. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 3.392, ranking it 4th out of 11 journals in the category "Substance Abuse".

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1977–present
Website
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0145-6008
Impact factor
3.392 (2009)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Alcohol use during pregnancy linked to offspring depression

Children of mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may be at an increased risk of developing depression in late adolescence, according to new University of Bristol research. The study, which used data from 14,541 pregnant ...

Health

Hangover drug shows wider benefits in research

A well-known hangover drug not only helps soothe pounding headaches but also triggers profound changes that protect the liver, USC scientists report in new findings that could help prevent alcohol-related harm.

HIV & AIDS

Drinking weakens bones of people living with HIV: study

For people living with HIV, any level of alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, raising the risk of osteoporosis, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston ...

Addiction

Researcher discovers gene mutation that contributes to addiction

In the field of addiction research, one question looms large: Why do some people face a higher risk than others for alcoholism and drug abuse? A researcher at the OU College of Medicine, William R. Lovallo, Ph.D., recently ...

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