American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine is a biweekly peer-reviewed medical journal published in two yearly volumes by the American Thoracic Society. It covers the pathophysiology and treatment of diseases that affect the respiratory system. The journal also publishes review articles in several forms. The "State-of-the-Art review" is a treatise usually covering a broad field that brings bench research to the bedside. Shorter reviews are published as "Clinical Commentaries" or "Pulmonary Perspectives". These are generally focused on a more limited area and advance a concerted opinion about care for a specific process. Case reports are also published. Recently the journal has included debates of a topical nature on issues of importance in pulmonary and critical care medicine and to the membership of the American Thoracic Society. Other recent changes have included incorporating works from the field of critical care medicine and the extension of the editorial governing body of journal policy to colleagues outside of the United States. The first issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine was published in March 1917 as the American

Publisher
American Thoracic Society
Country
United States
History
1917–present
Impact factor
10.191 (2010)

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Immunology

Omega-3 fatty acids tied to fewer childhood asthma symptoms

A six-month study of children from Baltimore City by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has added to evidence that having more omega-3 fatty acids in the diet results in fewer asthma symptoms triggered by indoor air pollution. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Endobronchial valves can improve lung physiology

(HealthDay)—Use of endobronchial valves (EBV) can improve lung physiology in patients with homogeneous emphysema with absence of collateral ventilation, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the American Journal ...

Neuroscience

Sugar entering the brain during septic shock causes memory loss

The loss of memory and cognitive function known to afflict survivors of septic shock is the result of a sugar that is released into the blood stream and enters the brain during the life-threatening condition. This finding, ...

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