Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

The Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology is a scholarly medical journal published monthly by the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. The purpose of the Annals is to serve as an objective evidence-based forum for the allergy/immunology specialist to keep up to date on current clinical science (both research and practice-based) in the fields of allergy, asthma, and immunology. The emphasis of the journal will be to provide clinical and research information that is readily applicable to both the clinician and the researcher. Each issue of the Annals shall also provide opportunities to participate in accredited continuing medical education activities to enhance overall clinical proficiency.

Publisher
Elsevier

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Immunology

Child asthma emergency visits drop after indoor smoking bans

A new study helps to answer the burning question of whether recently enacted indoor smoking bans in public areas have improved health. The research finds the bans are associated with a 17 percent overall reduction in the ...

Immunology

Allergic rhinitis has negative impact on QOL in teens

(HealthDay)—For adolescents, allergic rhinitis (AR) has a negative impact, affecting quality of life, daily functioning, and sleep, according to a review published online recently in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Immunology

How to predict biphasic allergic reactions in children

Children are more likely to have a repeat, delayed anaphylactic reaction from the same allergic cause, depending on the severity of the initial reaction. The first pediatric study to look at the predictors for this phenomenon ...

Immunology

Marijuana: The allergen you never knew existed

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses.

Immunology

Blood test predicts severity of peanut and seafood allergies

A new blood test promises to predict which people will have severe allergic reactions to foods according to a new study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in the The Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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