Brain and Language

An interdisciplinary journal, Brain and Language focuses on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying human language. The journal covers the large variety of modern techniques in cognitive neuroscience, including lesion-based approaches as well as functional and structural brain imaging, electrophysiology, cellular and molecular neurobiology, genetics, and computational modeling. All articles must relate to human language and be relevant to an elaboration of its neurobiological basis. Along with an emphasis on neurobiology, journal articles are expected to take into account relevant data and theoretical perspectives from psychology and linguistics.

Publisher
Elsevier
Impact factor
3.115 (2011)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Learning a new language alters brain development

The age at which children learn a second language can have a significant bearing on the structure of their adult brain, according to a new joint study by the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro at McGill ...

Neuroscience

Learning dialects shapes brain areas that process spoken language

Using advanced imaging to visualize brain areas used for understanding language in native Japanese speakers, a new study from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute finds that the pitch-accent in words pronounced in standard Japanese ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Bilingual brains better equipped to process information

Speaking more than one language is good for the brain, according to new research that indicates bilingual speakers process information more efficiently and more easily than those who know a single language.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain structure of infants predicts language skills at one year

(Medical Xpress)—Using a brain-imaging technique that examines the entire infant brain, researchers have found that the anatomy of certain brain areas – the hippocampus and cerebellum – can predict children's language ...

Neuroscience

How hearing 'twist my arm' engages the brain

Listening to metaphors involving arms or legs loops in a region of the brain responsible for visual perception of those body parts, scientists have discovered.

Neuroscience

Intensive training for aphasia: Even older patients can improve

Older adults who have suffered from aphasia for a long time can nevertheless improve their language function and maintain these improvements in the long term, according to a study by Dr. Ana Inés Ansaldo, PhD, a researcher ...

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