Clinical Chemistry

Clinical Chemistry, issued monthly, is published in print and electronically by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry. The journal welcomes contributions, either experimental or theoretical, in the field of laboratory medicine. It is the leading forum for peer-reviewed, original research on innovative practices in today’s clinical laboratory. In addition to being the most cited journal in the field, Clinical Chemistry has the highest Impact Factor among journals of clinical chemistry, clinical (or anatomic) pathology, analytical chemistry, and the subspecialties, such as transfusion medicine and clinical microbiology.

Publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry

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Immunology

The Achilles' heel of HIV

Researchers at the University of Bonn have discovered how cells in the body can detect the genetic material of so-called retroviruses. The pathogen of the immunodeficiency disease AIDS, the HI-1 virus, also belongs to this ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New malaria test could lead to global eradication of the disease

One of the biggest difficulties faced by worldwide programs aimed at eliminating malaria is that the tests they use are not sensitive enough to detect all people who have the disease and need treatment. A study appearing ...

Health

Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm

The early-stage study, from scientists at Imperial College London, investigated the sperm quality of 50 men whose partners had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Flaw in many home pregnancy tests can return false negative results

Each year, women in the U.S. rely on some 20 million home pregnancy tests to learn potentially life-altering news. Despite marketing claims that such tests are 99 percent accurate, research at Washington University School ...

Oncology & Cancer

Team studies blood test for prostate cancer

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting "cell-free" tumor DNA in the bloodstream.

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