Cortex

Cortex is a scientific journal published semimonthly by Elsevier. It is devoted to the study of "cognition and of the relationship between the nervous system and mental processes". The journal was founded in 1964 and is currently edited by Sergio Della Sala.

Publisher
Elsevier
Country
UK
History
1964–present
Impact factor
7.251 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Neuroscience

Sleep makes our memories more accessible, study shows

Sleeping not only protects memories from being forgotten, it also makes them easier to access, according to new research from the University of Exeter and the Basque Centre for Cognition, Brain and Language. The findings ...

Neuroscience

Lefty, righty brains count on same area for numbers

Lefties and righties may put pen to paper from different sides of the page, but when it comes to numbers, everything adds up using the same point in the brain, according to a recent Western study. The findings offer one more ...

Neuroscience

The brain's dress code

One dress—two perceptions. For some, it is black-blue, for others, it is white-gold. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, the neuroplasticity group headed by Prof. T. Schmidt-Wilcke (Department of Neurology, ...

Neuroscience

Can't count sheep? You could have aphantasia

If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia – a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a "mind's eye".

Neuroscience

Social groups and emotions

The semantic representation of social groups involves areas of the brain associated with processing emotions. So says a study at SISSA in collaboration with the University of Trieste and the University Hospital of Udine which ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Familiarity breeds empathy

The more time we spend with people from another nationality the more empathy we have for them, University of Queensland research has found.

Neuroscience

Mona Lisa's smile not genuine, researchers believe

New research has found that the Mona Lisa's famed smile is almost certainly 'forced'—raising the intriguing possibility that Leonardo deliberately portrayed her that way.

page 1 from 5