Critical Care Medicine

Critical Care Medicine is the premier peer-reviewed, scientific publication in critical care medicine. Directed to those specialists who treat patients in the ICU and CCU, including chest physicians, surgeons, pediatricians, pharmacists/pharmacologists, anesthesiologists, critical care nurses, and other healthcare professionals, Critical Care Medicine covers all aspects of acute and emergency care for the critically ill or injured patient. Each issue presents critical care practitioners with clinical breakthroughs that lead to better patient care, the latest news on promising research, and advances in equipment and techniques.

Publisher
LWW Journals

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Guidelines on caring for ICU patients with COVID-19

An international team including McMaster University researchers has come together to issue guidelines for health-care workers treating intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Guidelines detail management of liver failure in ICU patients

(HealthDay)—In an executive summary of a new guideline from the Society of Critical Care Medicine, published in the March issue of Critical Care Medicine, a set of evidence-based recommendations are presented for the management ...

Health

Firearm violence solutions from a public health perspective

While firearm violence is a major public health challenge in the United States, it has often been considered a law enforcement issue with only law enforcement solutions. An article by two University of Pennsylvania researchers ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New guidelines for hepatic failure in the intensive care unit

For critical care specialists, hepatic failure poses complex challenges unlike those of other critical illnesses. A new set of evidence-based recommendations for management of liver failure is presented in the March issue ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How sepsis care program saves lives and reduces costs

A sepsis care quality improvement program saves lives, shortens hospital stays and reduces healthcare costs, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago.

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