Development

Academic publishing describes the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted is often called the "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field. Most established academic disciplines have their own journals and other outlets for publication, although many academic journals are somewhat interdisciplinary, and publish work from several distinct fields or subfields. Along with the variation in review and publication procedures, the kinds of publications that are accepted as contributions to knowledge or research differ greatly among fields and subfields. Academic publishing is undergoing major changes, as it makes the transition from the print to the electronic format. Business models are different

Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1953–present
Website
http://dev.biologists.org/
Impact factor
6.898 (2010)

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Vaccination

Australia could become voice for global vaccine equality

An expert from The Australian National University (ANU) is urging Australia to support international calls at the World Trade Organization for pharmaceutical giants to not only waive intellectual property protections for ...

Oncology & Cancer

Sperm development linked to testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer to affect men between the ages of 15 and 49, and around 95% of these cases are caused by testicular germ cell tumors. Although testicular germ cell tumors typically manifest ...

Neuroscience

Circadian clock in the mouse placenta

The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulatory systems. As well as ensuring essential nutrients, endocrine and immunological signals get through to the fetus to support its development and growth, ...

Medical research

Avian insights into human ciliopathies

Ciliopathies are genetic disorders caused by defects in the structure and function of cilia, microtubule-based organelles present on the surface of almost every cell in the human body, which play crucial roles in cell signaling. ...

Genetics

A molecule that directs neurons

The habenula is a small region at the centre of the brain, but is crucial for people's lives. It is made up of groups of nerve cells that control the "neurotransmitters" of the brain, that is to say substances like dopamine, ...

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