Genes & Development

Genes & Development is a peer-reviewed academic journal in the field of molecular biology, molecular genetics, cell biology and development. Founded in 1987, the journal is published twice monthly by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press from editorial offices in Woodbury, New York, USA, in association with The Genetics Society. The 2008 impact factor for Genes & Development was 13.623. The journal was ranked fifth in the Molecular Biology and Genetics category over 1999–2004, according to ScienceWatch, with an average of 47 citations per paper. All issues are available online via the journal website as PDFs, with a text version additionally available from August 1997. Content over 6 months old is freely available. Since 1989, its Editor has been Terri Grodzicker (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA).

Publisher
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Country
United States
History
1987–present
Website
http://genesdev.cshlp.org/
Impact factor
13.892 (2010)

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Genetics

Researchers identify DNA elements that affect MECP2 expression

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital (NRI) have identified and characterized two regions of DNA required for the proper expression ...

Medical research

Discovery illuminates how thyroid hormone 'dims' metabolism

It has been known for some time that the thyroid gland is a strong regulator of the body's metabolism, making it key to many health conditions. But the molecular details of how thyroid hormone acts on cells in the body have ...

Genetics

Understanding cellular clock synchronization

Circadian clocks, which regulate the metabolic functions of all living beings over a period of about 24 hours, are one of the most fundamental biological mechanisms. In humans, their disruption is the cause of many metabolic ...

Genetics

Study reveals new insights into facial birth defects

Mount Sinai researchers have revealed new insights into how the body regulates craniofacial development in newborns, which can sometimes lead to birth defects such as cleft lip or palate.

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