International Journal of Epidemiology

The International Journal of Epidemiology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering research in epidemiology. It is the official journal of the International Epidemiological Association. The journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics.

Publisher
Oxford University Press
History
1972-present
Impact factor
5.262 (2009)

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Health

Nuts and peanuts may protect against major causes of death

A paper published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology confirms a link between peanut and nut intake and lower mortality rates, but finds no protective effect for peanut butter. Men and women who eat at least ...

Diabetes

Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk

An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, according to an international team of researchers.

Overweight & Obesity

Lifelong obesity linked to physical difficulties aged 50

People who are obese from childhood through to middle age are more than twice as likely to have difficulty with daily tasks such as lifting, climbing stairs and carrying shopping by the time they are 50, a new UCL study has ...

Health

Bangladesh health successes shift chronic diseases to poor

A new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology shows that over the past decades Bangladesh observed a successful health transition while chronic diseases shifted from the rich to affect in excess also ...

Health

Lack of sleep affects long-term health

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that maintaining a good night's sleep is important for our future health, partly because of how it affects lifestyle factors. Previous population based studies have ...

Health

Deworming debunked? Or good science gone bad?

Most scientists want to tell the truth. We want to help people by answering important questions, and sharing what we learn. But the research endeavor is big and messy. And as we've learned from the climate change and HIV/AIDS ...

Health

New research: Coffee not associated with lifestyle diseases

Danish researchers are the first in the world to have used our genes to investigate the impact of coffee on the body. The new study shows that coffee neither increases nor decreases the risk of lifestyle diseases.

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