Journal of Clinical Nursing

The Journal of Clinical Nursing (JCN) is an international, peer reviewed, scientific journal that seeks to promote the development and exchange of knowledge that is directly relevant to all spheres of nursing and midwifery practice. The primary aim is to promote a high standard of clinically related scholarship which supports the practice and discipline of nursing. JCN publishes high quality papers on issues related to clinical nursing, regardless of where care is provided. This includes - but is not limited to - ambulatory care, community care, family care, home, hospital, practice, primary and secondary, and public health.

Publisher
Wiley
Impact factor
1.118 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Cardiology

Therapeutic positioning doesn't affect vital parameters

(HealthDay)—For severely disabled patients with central neurological disorders, therapeutic positioning does not affect vital parameters, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Health

Handholding, speaking to patients reduces anxiety

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty under local anesthesia, handholding and providing spoken information correlate with reduced patient anxiety, according to a study published online Sept. 1 ...

Health

Disorganized documentation ups peri-op communication failures

(HealthDay)—Communication failures in the perioperative setting often result from inaccurate or inaccessible documentation, as well as document overload, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of ...

Surgery

Nurse follow-up by phone cuts problems post orthopedic Sx

(HealthDay)—A program of phone follow-up by nurses can reduce problems that discharged patients may experience after undergoing orthopedic surgery, according to research published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical ...

Diabetes

Follow-up phone calls may boost glycemic control in T2DM

(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes, follow-up phone calls after a monthly clinic visit could lead to clinically significant change in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) levels, according to a study published online Nov. ...

page 1 from 7