Journal of Clinical Oncology

The Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) is a medical journal published 3 times a month (36 issues a year) by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), with a 2010 impact factor of 18.970. JCO now accounts for nearly one in 10 of all oncology journal citations. This journal s focus is work that relates to the care of patients with cancer, e.g., clinical oncology. This journal publishes in varying formats. Original research reports are both a communication tool and reports for original research. Review articles can describe work that builds on previous original research, summarize the current state clinical oncology, or can be a point of critical analysis. Opinion is voiced in editorial formats, which include commentary and discuss controversies. There is also a format for perspectives from a person of public notoriety. Special articles are another form of communication besides original research reports, which promulgate guidelines, summaries of consensus, and other scholarly communications. Fundamental research is covered in the "Biology of Neoplasia" section.

Publisher
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Impact factor
18.372 (2011)

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Cancer

Precision oncology insights revealed for colorectal cancer

Next-generation sequencing of tumor DNA from patients with colorectal cancer revealed genetic alterations that were linked to different survival and treatment outcomes in an analysis led by a University of North Carolina ...

Cancer

Prognostic disclosure improves life expectancy estimates

(HealthDay)—Prognostic disclosure is associated with more realistic patient expectations of life expectancy (LE) in advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Cancer

Extended RAS testing urged before EGFR MoAB therapy

(HealthDay)—For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAB) therapy should be considered only after extended RAS testing, according to a study published ...

Cancer

Anti-stress hormone may provide indication of breast cancer risk

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that women with low levels of an anti-stress hormone have an increased risk of getting breast cancer. The study is the first of its kind on humans and confirms previous similar ...

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