Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

The Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport is an international refereed research publication covering all aspects of sport science and medicine. The Journal considers for publication Original research and Review papers in the sub-disciplines relating generally to the broad sports medicine and sports science fields: sports medicine, sports injury (including injury epidemiology and injury prevention), physiotherapy, podiatry, physical activity and health, sports science, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control and learning, sport and exercise psychology, sports nutrition, public health (as relevant to sport and exercise), and rehabilitation and injury management. Manuscripts with an interdisciplinary perspective with specific applications to sport and exercise and its interaction with health will also be considered.

Publisher
Elsevier

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Oncology & Cancer

New exercise guidelines for people with cancer

A decade-old treatment recommendation for people with cancer to take a "slowly slowly" approach to exercise has been replaced with new guidelines recommending a personalised exercise program including high-intensity workouts ...

Health

Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport

A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney.

Health

Bioengineers identify safer way to make rugby tackles

Bioengineers have compiled a set of recommendations that could significantly reduce concussions and other head injuries in rugby union, having assessed how head impacts and movement vary based on the position on the body ...

Health

Sedentary lifestyle may impair academic performance in boys

A sedentary lifestyle is linked to poorer reading skills in the first three school years in 6-8 year old boys, according to a new study from Finland. The study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland in collaboration ...

Health

How well do you know your supplement?

Only 35 per cent of Australian professional footballers were able to identify the benefits of a supplement they were taking, and 48 per cent admitted to never reading the labels.

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