Journal of the American College of Cardiology

The Journal of the American College of Cardiology, is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering all aspects of cardiovascular disease, including original clinical studies, experimental investigations with clear clinical relevance, state-of-the-art papers, viewpoints, and editorials and essays interpreting and commenting on the research presented. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Current Contents, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index, and Scopus. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 14.292, ranking it 2nd out of 114 journals in the category "Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems".

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1983-present
Impact factor
14.292 (2010)

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Cardiology

Five threats to heart health you may not be aware of

Many people can recite the major risk factors for heart disease, the stuff of posters, public service ads and dire warnings: smoking, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, lack of exercise.

Medications

History of liver disease does not impact efficacy of edoxaban

(HealthDay)—For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the efficacy and safety of edoxaban versus warfarin is not altered with a history of liver disease, according to a study published in the July 16 issue of the Journal ...

Cardiology

Young women who smoke face highest risk of major heart attack

Smoking increases both men's and women's risk of a major heart attack at all ages, but women smokers have a significantly higher increased risk compared to men, especially women under 50 years old, according to a study in ...

Cardiology

Study reveals new genetic link to heart disease

A collaboration involving the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the German Heart Center Munich, AstraZeneca, and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has demonstrated that more than 30 percent of heart disease risk stems ...

Cardiology

Cognitive decline may accelerate after heart attack, angina

Adults with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) are at higher risk for faster cognitive decline in the long-term, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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