Journal of the American Medical Association

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, medical journal, published by the American Medical Association. Beginning in July 2011, the editor in chief will be Howard C. Bauchner, vice chairman of pediatrics at Boston University’s School of Medicine, replacing Catherine D. DeAngelis, who has served since 2000. In 1883, the first editor was Nathan Smith Davis (1817–1904). From 1883–1960, this journal was listed with ISSN 0002-9955 and without the acronym JAMA. Furthermore, there are French and Spanish language editions of JAMA. Established in 1883 by the American Medical Association and published continuously since then, JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and ancillary content (such as abstracts of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report). The journal covers a variety of medical topics. It includes fundamental research, research for the clinical sciences, and informs physicians of developments in other fields. Issues pertaining to medicine and health care are debated in this journal. Broader topical coverage related to medicine, includes nonclinical aspects of medicine,

Publisher
American Medical Association
Country
United States
History
1883–present
Impact factor
28.899 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Health

How fast you walk says a lot about your health

During a doctor's appointment, there's a few measures that quickly get a physician up to speed on our current health, such as measuring blood pressure and checking our BMI. But researchers say it could be helpful to add one ...

Health

US study finds rise in human glyphosate levels

Levels of glyphosate, a controversial chemical found in herbicides, markedly increased in the bodies of a sample population over two decades, a study published Tuesday in a US medical journal said.

Health

Nearly half of resident physicians report burnout

Resident physician burnout in the U.S. is widespread, with the highest rates concentrated in certain specialties, according to research from Mayo Clinic, OHSU and collaborators. The findings appear on Tuesday, Sept. 18, in ...

Medical economics

Nearly 1 in 3 US physicians were born abroad

At a time when immigration is a hot-button issue, the American health care system is highly dependent on professionals born in other countries, an analysis of U.S. census data shows.

Autism spectrum disorders

No rise in autism in US in past three years: study

After more than a decade of steady increases in the rate of children diagnosed with autism in the United States, the rate has plateaued in the past three years, researchers said Tuesday.

page 1 from 50