Journal of Virology

The Journal of Virology is an academic journal that covers research concerning viruses, using cross-disciplinary approaches including biochemistry, biophysics, cell and molecular biology, genetics, immunology, morphology, physiology and pathogenesis. Established in 1967, it is published twice monthly by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Like other primary journals from the ASM, research papers are currently available free online four months after print publication. Its 2007 impact factor was 5.332, with a ranking of third of 25 journals in virology. The journal is indexed in Agricola, BIOSIS, Chemical Abstracts, Current Contents, EMBASE, Medline/Index Medicus and Science Citation Index. As of 2007, the Editor-in-Chief is Lynn W. Enquist (Princeton University, New Jersey, USA).

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Country
United States
History
1967–present
Impact factor
5.308 (2008)

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