Nature Immunology

Nature Immunology is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes papers of the highest quality and significance in all areas of immunology. Priority is given to work that provides fundamental insight into the workings of the immune system. Areas covered include, but are not limited to, innate immunity and inflammation; development; immune receptors, signaling and apoptosis; antigen presentation; gene regulation and recombination; cellular and systemic immunity; vaccines; immune tolerance; autoimmunity and tumor immunology, microbial immunopathology; and transplantation.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
England
History
2000–present

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Immunology

Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining

Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections ...

Immunology

Gut immune cells play by their own rules

Only a few vaccines—for example, against polio and rotavirus—can be given orally. Most must be delivered by injection. Weizmann Institute of Science researchers suggest this may be, in part, because the training program ...

Immunology

How the immune system maintains a healthy gut microbiota

Researchers from Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. The results of the international study may contribute to the development ...

Immunology

Snapshot turns T cell immunology on its head

Challenging a universally accepted, longstanding consensus in the field of immunity requires hard evidence. New research from the Australian Research Council Centre of excellence in advanced Molecular imaging has shown the ...

Immunology

The Achilles' heel of HIV

Researchers at the University of Bonn have discovered how cells in the body can detect the genetic material of so-called retroviruses. The pathogen of the immunodeficiency disease AIDS, the HI-1 virus, also belongs to this ...

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