Nature Structural & Molecular Biology

Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is an academic journal publishing research articles, reviews, news and commentaries in structural biology and molecular biology, with an emphasis on papers that further a "functional and mechanistic understanding of how molecular components in a biological process work together". One of the group of Nature journals, it is published by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Founded in 1994 under the title Nature Structural Biology (ISSN: 1072-8368), the journal was renamed to the present title in January 2004. Like other Nature journals, there is no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team, although peer review by external expert referees forms a part of the review process. Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is published monthly. Articles are archived online in text and PDF formats; access is by subscription only. Its 2009 impact factor was 12.273.

Publisher
Macmillan Publishers Macmillan
Country
United States
History
Nature Structural Biology (1994–2003); Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (2004–present)
Website
http://www.nature.com/nsmb/index.html
Impact factor
12.273 (2009)

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Medical research

Uncovering the HIV life cycle

Though it has been eclipsed lately by SARS-CoV-2, there is another global epidemic still threatening people: HIV/AIDS. According to UNAIDS, a United Nations initiative, some 38 million people worldwide are currently infected ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

New indication of a link between Alzheimer's and diabetes

Pathological protein clumps are characteristic of a series of diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and type 2 diabetes. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Bacterial link in celiac disease

Bacterial exposure has been identified as a potential environmental risk factor in developing coeliac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.

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